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Starting a new job

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Starting a new job

You attended interviews, handed in your resignation, and now it’s time to start your new job. You want to make a good impression from the start and avoid making common mistakes. Below we give our top tips for starting a new position:

  • Punctual & presentable – plan your journey to work with time to spare, and look presentable. An obvious one, but sometimes overlooked.
  • Be friendly – make introductions and be polite to set up good working relationships going forward.
  • Ask questions – if you need assistance, don’t be afraid to ask. Although you may want to make an impact straight away, there’s a lot to learn when you start a new job and you can’t be expected to know everything as soon as you start. Asking questions shows that you are interested and willing to learn.
  • Start building a network – you can begin to recognise who the important people are in your new workplace and begin to network accordingly. Having strong professional relationships will pay dividends throughout your career in the form of advice and assistance. And if you’re bad with names, write them down!
  • Politics – don’t get involved. At this stage, you’re a newcomer and should act like a guest. There’s always time later to befriend the veterans who can help you decode ‘how things work’.
  • Ensure that your job description is clear – you need to know exactly what is expected of you from day one. If you haven’t got a job description, then request one, and if this still isn’t forthcoming, then draft your own and send to your manager for approval.
  • Develop a 30/60/90 day plan – this will help you keep track of what you want to achieve during your initial 3 months. However, expect this to be malleable as you start to develop a clearer picture of your new role.
  • Start documenting your successes – it’s important to do this from the beginning, as it’s useful to bring up in future review meetings and will also serve to boost your own confidence that you’re performing well (or if you need to improve!).
  • Be realistic – set goals that are achievable. Take on what you know you can do well, and don’t take on everything, as you may overburden yourself.
  • Regular catch-ups – requesting regular meetings with your manager to check on your progress ensures you are confident you are learning the ropes in-line with the company’s expectations.
  • Don’t rush change – if you have identified areas that could be improved, ensure you take a measured approach to delivering adjustments. Sometimes, initiating big changes too quickly can alienate your colleagues and in the worst cases offend people.
  • Finally, relax – everyone around you has been through this (some many of times!). No one is judging you on your first day so focus on learning, communicating, and most importantly, enjoying the experience.

Are you reading this but don’t have a new position yet? Don’t forget to read our other career advice pieces:


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